Site Map Glossary - "What did you say?"

A

"A" in the Heat Loss Formula refers to the surface area of the object in question.

Bounder

An animal whose front and rear feet land in almost the same spot. An example is the squirrel.

Chlorophyll

The green pigment in plants that enables them to synthesize carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the presence of light.

Chinophile

An animal that stays for (and thrives in) the winter.

From the Russian word for "snow" ("Chino") and the Latin root for loving ("phile").

Chinophobe

An animal that leaves for the winter.

From the Russian word for "snow" ("Chino") and the Latin root for fearing ("phobe").

Chinophore

An animal that stays for (and tolerates) the winter.

From the Russian word for "snow" ("Chino") and the Latin root for tolerating ("phore").

Conductance

The property of a material which allows it to conduct heat from a higher temperature to a lower one.

Coniferous

Trees that have needles and develop seeds in cone-like structures.

Convection

One method by which heat is transferred.

d

"d" in the Heat Loss Formula refers to the thickness of the insulative layer of the object in question.

Deciduous

Trees that lose their leaves in the winter.

Density

The characteristic (e.g. of water in a lake) that depends on the temperature; (the mass per unit volume).

Depth Hoar

Ice crystals within the snow pack that have formed from water vapour that has risen after snow has sublimated near the ground.

Floater

An animal that travels on top of the snow. An example is the snowshoe hare.

Heat Loss Formula

The Heat Loss Formula describes the factors that affect the heat lost from an object due to conductance.

Hibernation

Hibernation is a state where an animal's metabolism is much slower than when it is active. The heart rate and body temperature are significantly lower. Ground squirrels go into hibernation for the winter in the Yukon.

Hopper

An animal that leaps with its back feet landing in front of its rear feet. An example is the snowshoe hare.

Intranivean

Region within the snow.

k

"k" in the Heat Loss Formula is a constant called the Thermal Conductivity.It refers to the insulative layer of the object in question.

Pacer

An animal that moves its front and rear legs on the same side together. This is the least common category of tracks. An example is the wolverine.

Photosynthesis

The process by which green plants synthesize carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water in the presence of light.

Radiation

One method by which heat is transferred.

Seeds

Seeds are the secret to perpetuating the species for plants that never live through the winter.

Straddle Width

The distance between the prints of an animal's front feet or rear feet.

Stratified

A way of describing a lake where the water temperature varies with depth (i.e. different layers, or "strata" are different temperatures).

Stride Length

The distance between prints of the same foot.

Strider

An animal that moves its left front and right rear legs together. An example is the dog.

Sublimation

An animal that moves its left front and right rear legs together. An example is the dog.

Subnivean

Region under the snow.

Supranivean

Region above the snow.

Ta

"Ta" in the Heat Loss Formula refers to the Temperature of the Air around the object in question.

Tb

"Tb" in the Heat Loss Formula refers to the Temperature of the Body in question.

Thermal Index

The parameter that quantifies how quickly heat is transferred (lost) by an object.

Torpor

Torpor is a state where an animal's metabolism is somewhat slower than when it is active. The heart rate and body temperature are not as much lower as when an animal goes into hibernation. Bears and red squirrels do not hibernate, they go into a state of torpor.

Transpiration

The process by which trees take up liquid water and dissolved nutrients with their roots and release water vapour from their leaves.

Turn Over

Is what happens to a lake as it cools from above 4 degrees Celsius (when cold water is more dense than warm) to less than 4 degrees Celsius (when colder water is less dense - to the temperature of freezing at which point ice floats!).

Vegetative Regeneration

Is the process by which plants die back to their roots each winter and grow new stems and leaves each spring.

Wader

An animal that is too heavy to travel on top of the snow - so it wades through the snow. An example is a moose.

 

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